Raipa caxy

play may have been mutilated in that earlier codex by one who was unconscious of the dramatic purpose of the speeches of Agave and Dionysus. lxxi But, as a whole, it would certainly have been regarded by any Greek tragedian as unsuitable for delivery before an enormous audience, like that which assembled in the theatre of Dionysus; as 'it is impossible for a thousand people at once to be sentimental and tender on the beauties of nature'.' It may also be noticed that Shelley's description, with which the present passage has before now been unfavourably contrasted2, is not true to the facts, as it does not really correspond to the actual scenery on the way to the castle of Petrella, which he had never visited; whereas the few touches of topographical detail given in the above passage are not only beautiful in themselves, but have also the advantage of being in strict accordance with the natural scenery of Cithaeron. xiii.; Cope in Cambridge Essays for I856, 'Onz the taste for theic icttresqzcw among the Greeks'; W. The sober temper is commended (1002), the gentle life extolled (388), and practical good sense preferred to the pretence of superior intelligence. 81), the head and hair correspond to the description given by Callistratus, but the t/zyrsus appears instead of the slain animal. 60) that the Maenad of Scopas may have suggested itself to the artist as a theme appropriate to the completion of the Theatre of Dionysus at Athens in B. In the Official Gzuide it is suggested that the relief was probably inserted as a panel in the base of a candelabrum. A young Faun, who holds a crook in his right hand, is holding up the left in astonishment. The woodcut is borrowed from King's Antique Gems and Rings 11 xxx I2 (also in King and Munro's Horace Odes II xix B). In his left he holds aloft a thyrsus capped with a pine cone, and a little below this a stick cloven at its upper end is tied to the wand by a single ribband. used by Milton]; (4) Joszhua Barnes, Cambridge, 1694; (5) Miusgrave, Oxford, 1778; (6) Beck, Leipsig, 1778-88; (7) Variorum ed., Glasgow, 1821 [vol. This loss may, of course, have been due to accident alone; a single leaf in the manuscript from which our only copy of the latter half of the play was transcribed, may have been torn out, simply because it was near the close of the volume; but it may also be worth suggestingr that the end of the lxvi AIN7TR OD UCTION. For comparison with the above passage, we can only quote the few following lines: 'High above there grow, With intersecting trunks, from crag to crag, Cedars, and yews, and pines; whose tangled hair Is matted in one solid roof of shade By the dark ivy's twine.' ONr THE MESSENGERS' SPEE CHES. | ~ nature are probably intended to be characteristic of * the enthusiasm of the votaries of Dionysus, whose favourite haunts are to be found in the woodland solitudes and on the lonely hills (e.g. i ~ ~ 1 1On the general subject of the Greek view of the picturesque in nature, see further, in Ruskin's Modern Painters, part IV, chap. 118-124; and i

In the course of last year, however, finding myself attracted once more to my original purpose, I set to work afresh, and devoted the summer of that year to recasting, or rather, entirely rewriting, the notes which I had already prepared, and also to reducing into some sort of order the materials collected for the remainder. Among the archaeologists of the last generation, to whose works I am thus under special obligations, are Otfried Miller and Otto Jahn. Several of the illustrations, however, are, I have reason to know, more accurate than those that have appeared elsewhere; and I may add in conclusion that a terracotta lamp from Cyprus (on p. In the case of living authorities on ancient art and archaeology, my thanks are due to Jahn's distinguished nephew, Professor Michaelis of Strassburg, for drawing my attention to one or two recent German contributions towards the archaeological illustration of points immediately connected with the play, and in particular for enabling me to supply a more accurate copy of one of the sculptured representations of the death of Pentheus, than those hitherto published: to C. 238) as well as a gem lately found in the north of England (p. A., Fellow and Librarian of Corpus Christi College. Giustiniani Palace, Iozme *Mlask of Silenus and Dionysus. Hence our play, with its story of just doom falling on the 'godless' Pentheus' (rov i Oeov, 995), may be regarded as in some sort an apologia and an eirenicon, or as, at any rate, a confession on the part of the poet that he was fully conscious that, in some of the simple 1 Ar.

Ti; Woermann, Uebcr deln landschaftlichen Aatursinn der Griechcen nmd Riomer, Miinchen, 1871, pp. The chorus in Greek tragedy is, again and again, the interpreter to the audience of the inner meaning of the action of the play; and the moral reflexions which are to be found in the lyrical portions of the Bacchae seem in several instances to be all the more likely to be meant to express the poet's own opinions, when we observe that they are not entirely in keeping S. We are told, for example, that 'to be knowing is not to be wise'; that, in other words, it is folly to be wise in one's own conceit (395); that the true wisdom consists in holding aloof from those who set themselves up to be wiser than their fellows, and in acquiescing contentedly in the common sense of ordinary men (427). The most memorable instance of the same subject is the masterpiece of Scopas which is the theme of several epigrams of the Greek Anthology (Alnth. On the other hand, in a relief formerly in the Borghese collection (Winckelmann, no. He elsewhere recognises a fresh development of Greek art under the influence of Tragedy, a development which shewed itself not only in the groups of that sculptor but also in single figures like that of his Maenad (p. The height of the original is I foot, 5 inches; the woodcut is copied from the engraving in the British i Museum Marbles x plate 35. She is seated under a tree and has just opened the sacred basket, out of which a snake is seen emerging. DANCING FAUN, with head tossed back and hair floating in the breeze, bunches of grapes in his right hand, and a panther's skin over his right arm. with Latin translation by Aemilius Portus, Heidelberg, I597; (3) Paul Stephens, Geneva, 1602 [the ed. I855 [2 vols., with full ayparatus criticus at the end of each volume]; (II) A. I867 [3 vols., with a few of the more important various readings and emendations at the foot of the page]; (12) Nauck ed. with introduction 'de Euripidis vita' &c., and 'annotatio critica']; (I3) 1W. Those who shared that advantage -r- ~ will long remember his happy renderings, and his brief and pointed criticisms, which had the rare merit, Ad of being sufficient for their immediate purpose, while at the same time they were calculated to stimulate the student to further investigation on his own account. FOR my earliest interest in the celebrated, though often far from easy, play, a new edition of which is here offered to the public, I am indebted to the fact that, some fifteen years ago, in common with many other students in this University, I had the advantage of attending a course of lectures upon it, by the Reverend W. Thompson, the present Master of Trinity College, who was at that time Regius Professor of Greek. My endeavour throughout has been to supply, in a convenient and comprehensive form, a kind of handbook to the criticism, interpretation and archaeological illustration of the play, which should be interesting and instructive to the student, whether at School or College, and also to some extent useful to the more advanced scholar. The short introductory essays with which the volume opens, include a sketch of the closing years of the poet, and some account of the points of interest whether in mythology or in art, in dramatic or in textual criticism, which are connected with this, perhaps, his latest work.

In the course of last year, however, finding myself attracted once more to my original purpose, I set to work afresh, and devoted the summer of that year to recasting, or rather, entirely rewriting, the notes which I had already prepared, and also to reducing into some sort of order the materials collected for the remainder.

Among the archaeologists of the last generation, to whose works I am thus under special obligations, are Otfried Miller and Otto Jahn. Several of the illustrations, however, are, I have reason to know, more accurate than those that have appeared elsewhere; and I may add in conclusion that a terracotta lamp from Cyprus (on p.

In the case of living authorities on ancient art and archaeology, my thanks are due to Jahn's distinguished nephew, Professor Michaelis of Strassburg, for drawing my attention to one or two recent German contributions towards the archaeological illustration of points immediately connected with the play, and in particular for enabling me to supply a more accurate copy of one of the sculptured representations of the death of Pentheus, than those hitherto published: to C. 238) as well as a gem lately found in the north of England (p. A., Fellow and Librarian of Corpus Christi College.

Giustiniani Palace, Iozme *Mlask of Silenus and Dionysus.

Hence our play, with its story of just doom falling on the 'godless' Pentheus' (rov i Oeov, 995), may be regarded as in some sort an apologia and an eirenicon, or as, at any rate, a confession on the part of the poet that he was fully conscious that, in some of the simple 1 Ar.

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